Climate change, it’s the term on everybody’s lips at the moment. And while it’s mentioned in the news time and time again, how often do we stop to think of the impact it might have on us personally?

It may seem like a slow process but changes are happening and New Zealand is not immune to the effects of climate change. We are already experiencing some unusual weather patterns – higher temperatures, increased rainfall – and by the end of the century this will be noticeably more frequent.

For each year that passes, more changes occur in New Zealand’s climate and it’s time to take it seriously.

It’s not just a bit of rain here and there.

Climate change is a process that could greatly impact many of the resources we take for granted.

We need to ask ourselves, are we preparing the best we can?

New Zealand beach during storm

Extreme weather may have a year round effect

With a rise in temperature comes an increase in the need to stay cool.

The NZ summer is becoming noticeably hotter, with high temperatures now lasting throughout Autumn.

As much as we Kiwis love to don our t-shirts and jandals, this may not always be enough to combat the heat. Increasingly hot summers will no doubt result in a heightened demand for air conditioning as we all seek relief from the heat.

Extreme weather conditions won’t be limited to the summer time, winter will present its own set of challenges.

Rainfalls are expected to intensify in the winter months causing stress on our riverbanks and drainage systems. We can see from past experiences that floods can wreak havoc on New Zealand towns both urban and rural.

Experts are keeping a close eye on weather trends to help us prepare for what’s ahead in years to come.

Girl on beach in summer

Our most valuable resource will become even more precious

Water is undoubtedly the most important substance on the planet.

All living things depend on water for survival.

Turning on the tap and filling a glass with clean water is something many of us take for granted. But there’s no better time than now to appreciate our access to quality water.

Long, dry summers naturally increase the demand for water.

Our bodies need it, our land needs it, but when there is a limited amount available, we have to restrict its use to make sure everyone gets their fair share.

Unfortunately, an increase in winter rainfall is not going to balance this out.

When it comes to water, it’s a delicate balance of quality, quantity and timing.

We may be inundated with water in the winter months, but this doesn’t ensure that all of that water is good enough to store.

It’s fresh water we’re after and marine and wildlife depend on it much the same way we do. Too much or too little and we struggle to cope. This sparks of a whole range of issues for us and our environment.

climate change affects our clean water

Being adaptable and resilient will be our greatest defense to climate change

With so much evidence to support it, it’s almost impossible to deny that climate change is real.

But it’s not all doom and gloom.

Climate change is a gradual process which means we all have the chance to adapt.

We are becoming more and more aware of how best to look after our natural resources, especially now that we know the effect climate change may have on our environment. And whilst we can’t control everything, our efforts to protect those who can’t protect themselves, help to minimise the impact of climate change on our marine and wildlife.

It’s up to us to be resilient and learn how to cope with extreme weather conditions.

We are lucky to live in an age where technology can help keep us comfortable, whatever the weather.

As temperatures rise, turning on the air conditioning at home will be something we all look forward to after a day in the summer sun. And in the midst of a winter downpour, a heat pump will offer just the right amount of warmth to see us through.

With setting for both heating and cooling, a heat pump is the easiest and most efficient way to keep your home comfortable.

Call Heat and Cool today and have the team help you prepare for whatever the climate throws at you.

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